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CHILD GAUGE 2020

CG 2020: Food and nutrition security

This 15th annual review of the situation of the country’s children is published by the Children’s Institute (CI), University of Cape Town, in partnership with UNICEF South Africa; the DSI-NRF Centre for Excellence in Human Development, University of the Witwatersrand; the Standard Bank Tutuwa Community Foundation; and the DG Murray Trust.

The theme of the 2020 issue – “Food and nutrition security” – draws attention to the slow violence of child malnutrition and identifies critical points for intervention across the life course, motivating for urgent, early and sustained investment in order to reduce the burden of stunting, obesity and non-communicable diseases; improve children’s health, education and employment prospects; and drive national development.
 


 

Suggested citation:
May J, Witten C & Lake L (eds) (2020) South African Child Gauge 2020. Cape Town: Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town.

Please remember to acknowledge the authors of individual chapters, for example:

Swart R, van der Merwe M, Spires M & Drimie S (2020) Child-centred food systems: Ensuring healthy diets for children. In: May J, Witten C & Lake L (eds) South African Child Gauge 2020. Cape Town: Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town.



Click on the links below to download a PDF version.

 Full Gauge

Full Poster

Full Policy Brief


PART ONE: CHILDREN AND LAW REFORM

Legislative developments affecting children in 2019/2020

 

PART TWO: FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY

  1. The slow violence of malnutrition
  2. Child-centred food systems: Ensuring healthy diets for children
  3. Corporate fast-food advertising targeting children
  4. Food and nutrition security of the unborn child: The role of maternal nutrition
  5. Food and nutrition security of infants and young children: Breastfeeding and complementary feeding
  6. Food and nutrition security for the preschool child: Enhancing early childhood development
  7. Food and nutrition security in schools: Threats and opportunities for intervention
  8. Transforming social protection to strengthen child nutrition security
  9. Double burden and double duty: Government action required to improve child nutrition


PART THREE: CHILDREN COUNT – THE NUMBERS